PasKaPoo Park Historical Museums

 

 parkyard

 

#1 C-1 SERIAL NO. C12488M
The C-1 series started in 1934 and went to 1937. This truck was purchased new by Emil Hjelmeseth in 1935. He was one of the early pioneer Hjelmesetch Brothers of Hoadley. Emil that year won half of a $10,000 Irish Sweepstakes ticket. In addition to the truck, he bought a new case tractor and threshing machine with his winnings, and built a new house. Emil took extremely good care of his machinery, including the truck. Charlie Plank remembers that Emil volunteered his time and the use of his truck to haul sand for a tennis court being built at the time in Hoadley. He warned Charlie to be very careful with his shovel, as he did not want the paint scratched. He eventually traded the truck in on a 1942 Packard car.The truck may have had a charmed life, for it became the property of Bill Cripps of Bentley, who, in the last years that he drove it, had failing eyesight. He was in the habit of attending the Red Deer Auction Market when it was situated beside Gaetz Avenue on the north hill. Coming and going, he would drive slowly down the highway, taking care to stay well away from the edge of the pavement. He trusted other drivers to avoid him, and his trust was never misplaced. Yet Clarence Eklund has said of him, "Bill Cripps had more misfortune in his life than any man should have." For once, it seems, he beat the odds. The vehicle came up for auction at Cripp's estate sale and was bought by a man named Helge Tranberg. Tranberg reconditioned the motor in Davis Bros. Garage in Rimbey in the early sixties. Ken bought the fifty year old vehicle in 1984 and restored it in 1985. It was used after restoration in a television commercial for the 636 lottery.

BACK TO TOP

 

#2 D-2 SERIAL NO. D22408
The D series started in 1937 and went to 1940. Ken acquired this 1938 truck from Clarence Eklund in 1982. At the time it hadn't run for twenty years. Ken had it going in about three days. He restored it fully in 1984. Clarence bought the truck at an auction sale for Roy Leach who lived south of Gilby. He thought he had purchased, with the highest bid, a group of several old cars and trucks, but the auctioneer argued the point and the dispute was settled with the auctioneer giving Clarence the International for nothing. This, of course, was the only one he badly wanted.

BACK TO TOP

 

#3 K-1 SERIAL NO. 1885 The K series started in 1940 and went to 1947. Ken used two trucks to make this truck. Both were 1941's, and both were maroon in colour. Also, both serial numbers were only two numbers apart, #1885 and #1887; so both must have came on the same flatcar. One truck was purchased new by Arthur Jones, of Rimbey, in 1941. Ken bought it from James Johnson, Bentley, in 1985. This one too, was located through Clarence Eklund. It had been owned by Albert Philipzik of the Iola district, and Ken himself had owned it in 1953, the year he and Rosie were married. He had sold it back to Davy Jones, son of Arthur, later repurchased it from Johnson. To make the fully restored vehicle complete in 1986, Ken combined this one with parts from a second truck of the same vintage that had been owned by Olaf Mandseth of Hoadley.

BACK TO TOP
 

#4 KB-1 SERIAL NO. 4480
The KB series started in 1947 and went to 1949. P. Ewaschuk, of Carstairs, Alberta, was the first owner of this truck. The second owner was Ed Hunt. Ed lived near Ken Smithson when Ken was still on the farm. Ed sold the truck to Thomas Rycroft of Olds, Alberta. Ken bought the vehicle from Mr. Rycroft in 1982. Alfred Thills' donated his 1948 KB-1. Parts were used from Thills' truck in the restoration. The truck was completely restored in 1984 by Ken Smithson. After restoration it was the feature vehicle in the movie "Isaac Littlefeathers". The truck was driven by the film star, Lou Jacoby.

BACK TO TOP

 

#5 L110 SERIAL NO. 8157 The L series started in 1949 and went to 1952. Vern Stewart donated this 1951 model to Ken in 1981. It was purchased new in Athabasca, Alberta, by Mel Hughes. Hughes, some years later, traded it in for a car at Hoag's Garage, Rimbey. Walter Peabody was the salesman. Ken saw it there and wanting to buy it, offered $575 for it, but Hoag wanted $600. Walter said he would eat it before he would sell it for less, but Ken got it, without even a tooth mark, for his original offer. The year was 1958, and Ken owned that truck until 1963, when he traded it to Montalbetti Bros., Bluffton, for a new truck. The salesman was Wm. Rachuk. Ken later bought the old truck back and sold it privately to Bob Marshall in Wetaskiwin. Somehow he kept track of this old girl that was always called Nellie-Bellie, by his girls, until he bought it for the third time and restored it in 1982.

BACK TO TOP

 

#6 R110 SERIAL NO. 7845C
The R series started in 1953 and went to 1955. The 1955 model was an Eckville truck. It was bought new there by Brian McMann. Ken got it from Clarence Eklund in 1982 and restored it in 1985. The 1953-54 R series had a two piece back window. It had smaller side windows. They were the same cab as the L series. The 1955 R series had a one piece back window and the same cab as the S series.

BACK TO TOP

 

#7 S100 SERIAL NO. 7473C
The S series started in 1955 and went to 1957. Ken bought the 1956 model from James Pulsifer of James River Bridge, Alberta. It was designated the "Painters' Truck" as it had been owned by professional painters who had left it dribbled all over with a coat of many colours. Also, someone had put a couple of serious dents in the top of the cab. "How did the dents occur?" asked Ken of James Pulsifer. Said James, "The previous owner had tried to drive it into a shed and found the entrance too low. So he turned the truck around and tried to back it in. It was still too low." Ken bought the truck in 1981, and restored it in 1985. Rimbey Collision Repair did the body work.

BACK TO TOP

 

#8 A100 SERIAL NO. 2515C
The A series started in 1957 and went to 1959. This model was their Golden Jubilee model. This truck, a 1958 model, was also used in the motion picture "Isaac Littlefeathers", and was also driven by Lou Jacoby. Little of its early history is known. Ken bought it from Clarence Eklund in 1981 and restored in 1984. This truck is actually made up from portions of two, known as "the pink" and "the blue". Little is known about "the pink" other than it was the colour of the truck. "The pink" supplied parts to restore "the blue". "The blue" had been owned new by Jim Merriman, who lived east of Eckville, Alberta. Ron Palm had acquired it, but always had trouble getting it to run. Merriman had rolled it while he was transporting a lawnmower in the cab. While trying to control the lawnmower, he lost control of the truck.

BACK TO TOP

 

#9 B100 SERIAL NO. C2020A
The B series started in 1957 and went to 1959. The 1959 model was bought from Johnny Walters of Leedale and restored in 1987. Ken acquired it in 1985. The B series was when they first came out with the V8 motors. They had 304's and 345's. This one had a 304 and a three speed transmission. Ken took them out and put in a B-264 six cylinder and a four speed transmission.

BACK TO TOP

 

#10 C110 SERIAL NO. CW13630A6
The C110 series started in 1961 and went to 1962. This 1961 International truck was listed in one of Norm Moore's auction sales at Buck Creek, Alberta, in 1985. It was supposed to have been restored, but the job had not been done to Ken's rigid specifications. Too much was covered with window putty and paint, and Ken had a great deal of work to do on it, including welding on a new cab, a bead at a time, moving from one side to the other to allow the welding to cool. This was to prevent the metal from shrinking and buckling when welded with an acetylene torch. The job took two or three evenings. It was ready to show in 1986.

BACK TO TOP

 

#11 C1100 SERIAL NO. CW39593A6
The C1100 series started in 1963 and went to 1964. A man in Yeoford owned two of these 1963 trucks. When he died his son-in-law contacted Ken to see if he wanted to buy one. Ken did. To restore it he had to rely heavily on parts from other trucks. The motor, transmission and other parts came from a derelict owned by Frank Watt, of Rimbey. Other parts were also obtained from John Lewis of Bluffton. Still other bits and pieces were found at John Lauridsen's, Bluffton. The truck was restored in 1986.

BACK TO TOP

 

#12 D1100 SERIAL NO. CW59219A6
The D1100 series only ran one year in 1965. The 1965 model was bought from Emil Stieger in 1985 and restored in 1986. It had come earlier from Thomas Rumpel in Calgary. This is the truck that is driven by Clifford Vigen to shows and in parades when Ken has put the fleet on display. It turned over the 100,000 mile digit in 1989.

BACK TO TOP

 

#13 1100A SERIAL NO. C13150C005320
The 1100A series was made only in 1966. This 1966 truck was purchased from Clarence Eklund in 1985 and Ken restored it in 1989. Clarence called it the Sawmill Truck because it had been used in a sawmill near Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. Carl Posti, of the Gilby area, who ran a small sawmill, had bought it from Edwards Garage in Rocky Mountain House. Edwards owned a large sawmill.

BACK TO TOP

 

#14 1100B SERIAL NO. 713108C019151
The 1100B series was made only in 1967. Mike Bunting of R.R.#2 Bluffton sold this 1967 model to Ken. It had been bought new in Thorhild, Alberta. Ken got it in 1985 and did not restore it until 1989. This truck took the least parts and the least time to restore.

 

BACK TO TOP

 

#15 1100C SERIAL NO. 213108C033611
The 1100C series was made in 1968 and part of 1969. This 1968 truck was the last one restored in 1989. Ken obtained it from Clarence Eklund in 1985. As of spring, 1990, it had never been on the road. This truck has a six cylinder motor, but parts of a V8 equipped truck were used in its restoration. The serial number, as it must, matches the six cylinder truck. Clarence bought this vehicle from Vern Otto, the Imperial Oil dealer in Lacombe, Alberta. Vern's father had purchased it new. Vern had begun restoration when Clarence bought it.

BACK TO TOP

 

#16 1100D SERIAL NO. 3131084025307
The 1100D series was made in 1970. Ken obtained this 1970 model from John Lewis, Bluffton in 1985. John had bought it at an auction sale, but had driven it very little. While in running order it had a number of defects. The brakes were worn out; it leaked oil and it showed numerous rust patches. This vehicle came with a low-cost grill. Ken found a chrome grill on a old truck owned by Adrian Vig. "But," said Ken, "to get the grill, I had to buy the whole truck for $400." This one was also restored in 1989.

BACK TO TOP

 

#17 1010 SERIAL NO. 112108H319333
The 1010 series was made in 1971. The 1971 model was bought from Peter Baker, Leslieville, Alberta, in 1985. Baker's father-in-law had bought it new. This truck had a plastic grill, and there was not very many like it. Baker was using the truck, but Ken needed it badly and spent two or three years negotiation. Finally and reluctantly, Baker parted with it, and Ken restored it in 1988.

BACK TO TOP

 

#18 1110 SERIAL NO. B13105H243016
The 1110 series was made in 1972 and 1973. The 1972 model Ken bought from Lloyd Strain, who lived east and north of Hoadley. Lloyd had bought it as a used vehicle from Roper's Ltd. in Rimbey. It had a six cylinder Chevrolet motor in it. This motor came from the factory in the new truck. The explanation is that the American Motor Company had used Chevrolet motors, and when American Motors ceased manufacture, International Harvester acquired these motors. A fender and a door had to be replaced on this truck. The originals had been damaged by being run into with a disc in the farmyard. Ken got it in 1980; restored it in 1986.

BACK TO TOP

 

#19 100 SERIAL NO. 4H1C0DHB50538
The 100 series was made in only 1974. International Harvester Company ceased manufacturing pick-up trucks in 1974. This one rolled off the assembly line on December 16, 1974. Ken bought two 1974 trucks and combined the best parts of both. He bought a half-ton from Johnny Keegstra. This one was badly rusted. Then he bought a three-quarter ton from P and B Equipment, Wetaskiwin. It was their last service truck. P and B stands for Pocock and Brown. It was the basics from the three-quarter ton that were used in restoration. The frames were almost identical, but the three-quarter ton was slightly deeper and the springs were heavier. It came with a 345 cubic cm motor. The cabs were identical. The truck was restored in 1988.

BACK TO TOP

BACK TO TRUCK MUSEUM MAIN PAGE