PasKaPoo Park Historical Museums

 

 parkyard

 
bb shop pic
The Barber Shop 1940'S 

Rimbey's first barber was Lloyd Newsom, who opened a barbershop in 1915 next to Pop Calkins' Coffee Shop. (There is a picture of Mr. Newsom's shop in the main museum building (Historical Museum) in the "Town Development" display).   

This Particular building was built in the late 1920’s, moved to the main street in early 1930’s; an addition was added onto this building in the late 1930’s.    

Stella Rimbey operated a ladies wear in this building. There was also a hair salon operated from this building at one time.  

Although Mr. Tom Spinks trained as a barber in Toronto and spent twelve years practicing his trade across Alberta and Saskatchewan, he came to the Rimbey area to try his hand at farming. He operated a farm west of Rimbey for twenty-five years before returning to barbering. In 1945 he sold his farm and moved to Sexsmith, where he worked as a barber for two years.  

 When Mr. and Mrs. Tom Spinks returned to Rimbey in 1947 they took over this building. The front room was Tom’s Barber Shop and the back room was their living quarters.  

Tom's shop was an entertaining place to go: in addition to a haircut and a good story from the barber, patrons might have the opportunity to hear a tune or two! Tom kept his fiddle in his shop and would play it while waiting for customers. Mr. Spinks barbered in this building until he retired in 1969 at the age of 82.  

In 1978, Neville Roper, then owner of this building (the Barber Shop) donated it to the park and it was moved onto the present site. At a later date his family donated some of Mr. Spink’s equipment including the barber chair.

                                    

In the front room, on the counter near the large copper water jug is a razor holder. This wooden stand had a metal clamp to hold a straight razor and a ring on which to hang the leather strop used to sharpen it. The copper jug was fitted with a tap, to be used in place of a sink in a building without running water. 

If you think shaving with a modern razor is difficult, imagine shaving with a straight razor which was no more that a very sharp knife. 

 

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